The Committee on the Rights of the Child today completed its consideration of the combined second to fourth periodic report of Iraq on its implementation of the provisions of the Convention on the Rights of the Child and its initial reports under the Optional Protocols on children in armed conflict and on the sale of children, child prostitution and child pornography.
Presenting the reports, Mohammed Mahdi Ameen Al-Bayati, Minister of Human Rights of Iraq, said that Iraq was facing serious challenges at all levels. Terrorist groups had taken control of several areas and had perpetrated war crimes and genocide, including disappearances and sexual slavery against children. The current situation had a direct effect on children, causing displacement and affecting their rights to access to education and health. Despite challenges, Iraq had achieved progress in combatting poverty, illiteracy, domestic violence and human trafficking, ensuring alternative care and access to education, and protecting the rights of persons with disabilities.

 

 

 

 

 

3.2 million people are food insecure, including those who depend on agriculture for their livelihoods.

-Violence continuesto force people to abandon theirfarms and agriculture-based livelihoods. Insecurity, watershortages and the lack or high cost of agricultural inputs continue to negatively affect the performance of the agriculture sector.

-Lack of space for livestock in camps to which people are fleeing conflict has resulted in some people with animal herds unable or reluctant to relocate to camps. Herders who are unable to feed their livestock are forced to abandon or sell them, noticeably decreasing their herd size.
-Infrastructure such aswatersuppliesfor agricultural and domestic use has been damaged or destroyed.Heavy contamination of retaken areas with unexploded ordnance and improvised explosive devices pose immediate and long-term risks.100%|300|pdfjs}

 

 

 

 

Since 2014, the conflict in Iraq has forced an estimated 5.7 million children and adults to leave their homes and seek shelter from the fighting. More than 2.8 million displaced Iraqis have returned home, while more than 2.9 million people remain displaced (IOM). MSF has seen an increasing number of families leaving the camps and returning home. Those remaining in the camps are often the poorest and the most vulnerable who cannot afford to leave the camps and rebuild their destroyed homes. Others say they can’t go home because they don’t feel safe.
Winter is exacerbating the inadequate living conditions in the camps. As temperatures dip below five degrees Celsius, we are seeing growing numbers of patients with respiratory infections. The poor living conditions are also causing skin diseases, diarrhoea and neonatal sepsis (a bacterial infection in newborn babies).
In West Mosul, Anbar, Hawija and Salaheddin, homes, infrastructure and services have been almost completely destroyed. In West Mosul and Hawija, the healthcare system remains in a dire situation. Most hospitals and clinics were bombed and there is a severe lack of services, equipment, medical staff and medication. The city of Hawija is still virtually empty as people wait for the area to be cleared of improvised explosive devices, mines and unexploded ordnance. In many post-conflict areas unemployment is also high and people struggle to cover basic living costs.
 

•As  of  26  June,  the  number  of  internally displaced  persons  (IDPs)  from  Fallujah  has reached 85 302.

•WHO has delivered 29 interagency emergency health kits (IEHK) to Anbar. Each kit caters for the needs of 10 000 people for 3 months. 

•WHO  provided  Anbar  Directorate  of  Health (DoH)  with  8  fully  equipped  mobile  medical clinics  to  assist  in  the  delivery  of  essential health   services,   including   referrals   to displaced populations  in  hard-to-reach  areas in the governorate. 

•WHO-implementing  partners  are  providing essential health services through their mobile medical  teams  to  returnees  and  IDPs  in  the newly liberated areas of Anbar governorate.

•The number of medical consultations through mobile clinics in Anbar totalled 17 185 in June alone. •WHO  Regional  Director  for  the  Eastern Mediterranean Dr Ala Alwan visited Iraq from 8 to 10 June 2016.

 

 

 

 

More than 25000 children werev reached with the 3rd dose of the oral polio vaccine and 24000 vaccinated against measles in 6 governorates of Baghdad (Kharkh), Dahuk, Kirkuk, Thiqar, Salahaldeen and Wassit to ensure more children are protected against vaccine preventable diseases
 A total of 500 000 consultations for various diseases were recorded in all Government and health partner supported health facilities in eight conflict affected Governorates. The majoritywomen and children under the age of 5 years
 In addition, more than 235 000 consultations were recorded in WHO-Government supportedfacilities and those run by WHO’s implementing partners in Ninewa, Kirkuk, Baghdad, Khabat and Erbil including more than 5 000 children under the age of 5 years.
 WHO supported 5 Directorates of Health and 4 implementing partners with emergency medical supplies including medicines and kits sufficientfor more than 241 000 people. The supplies include medicines used to treat chronic conditions, skin infections and antibiotics. Also provided were essential medicines used during surgical procedures

 

 

 

 

With an estimated population of 31.7 million, of which 41% is under the age of 15
, Iraq’s economy has been under considerable stress to maintain suitable living standards and adequate employment growth. Overall, Iraq’s economic growth – although positive over the last few years – is considered to be unsustainable, partly due to its high reliance on oil related revenues and poor private sector development associated with conflict and political instability. It is also non-inclusive, with an enormous gap between the very wealthy and those living below the subsistence level. A large section of the population is caught in the poverty trap with a serious shortage of employment opportunities - particularly for young people - and a low participation of women in the labour market, accompanying food insecurity and only limited access to basic services.
The original indicator measured the proportion of people living on less than US$ 1 per day, but Iraq exceeded this target relatively quickly. To accommodate this rapid achievement, the indicator was revised to measure the proportion of people with incomes below US$ 2.5 per day. Iraq’s national target was to reduce the proportion of the population living in poverty to 16% by 2015. This figure declined from 13.9% in 2007 to 11.5% in 2011, therefore this indicator has been achieved. 

 

 

 

 

KEY HUMANITARIAN ISSUES

The humanitarian crisis in Iraq has been deteriorating rapidly since June 2014: the ongoing conflict has displaced over 1.8 million people and exacerbated pre-existing vulnerabilities throughout the country. The historical waves of conflict dating from 1991, the highly scattered nature of displacement in Iraq, combined with the complex ethno-sectarian drivers of the conflict, presents a challenge for humanitarian actors to equitably meet assistance needs and achieve effective protection monitoring across the whole of Iraq. 

 
 
 
 

The internal armed conflict in Iraq has escalated
since January (2014) and prompted a protection
crisis impacting millions of Iraqis. About 20,000
civilians have been killed or injured across Iraq
between January and September 2014.
Violations of
international humanitarian law by all parties to the conflict
are widespread, including indiscriminate attacks and the
use of explosive weapons in populated areas. Multiple
parties to the conflict, including Islamic State of Iraq and
the Levant (The internal armed conflict in Iraq has escalated since January (2014) and prompted a protection crisis impacting millions of Iraqis. About 20,000 civilians have been killed or injured across Iraq between January and September 2014. Violations of international humanitarian law by all parties to the conflict are widespread, including indiscriminate attacks and the use of explosive weapons in populated areas. Multiple parties to the conflict, including Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL), are engaged in increasing incidents of gross human rights abuses. Attacks on essential public facilities such as hospitals and schools are frequent and the denial of access to basic services such as water and electricity has been employed as a weapon of war. ISIL), are engaged in increasing incidents of
gross human rights abuses. Attacks on essential public
facilities such as hospitals and schools are frequent and
the denial of access to basic services such as water and
electricity has been employed as a weapon of war.

OVERVIEW

The internal armed conflict in Iraq has escalated since January (2014) and prompted a protection crisis impacting millions of Iraqis. About 20,000 civilians have been killed or injured across Iraq between January and September 2014. Violations of international humanitarian law by all parties to the conflict are widespread, including indiscriminate attacks and the use of explosive weapons in populated areas. Multiple parties to the conflict, including Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL), are engaged in increasing incidents of gross human rights abuses. Attacks on essential public facilities such as hospitals and schools are frequent and the denial of access to basic services such as water and electricity has been employed as a weapon of war.

Civilians of all ethnic and religious backgrounds have been targeted by the violence. This includes minority communities such as Yezidis, Christians and Turkomen in the north, and also Shiites and Sunnis. Women have been particularly brutalized, with thousands reportedly abducted, sold, and abused. Rapes, executions and forced child recruitment are widespread. 

 

 

 

On 13–14 November 1999, over 150 delegates from five countries arrived in Cmbridge to attend a conference entitled ‘Sanctions on Iraq: Background, Consequences, Strategies’. In the packed auditorium, they listened as eighteen speakers from four countries – including prominent historians, diplomats, public health specialists, anthropologists, journalists, activists and Iraqi citizens – chronicled Iraq’s manifold suffering under the sanctions regime imposed after the 1990 invasion of Kuwait. In session after session, the audience contributed their challenges, questions, private reflections and professional experiences. The result was an impassioned debate. While the whole dynamic of this dialogue cannot be reproduced in print, the Proceedings offer the speeches that launched it. We invite readers to engage critically with this story of disaster.

 

 

 

After two international wars (the Iran-Iraq war of 1980-88 and the Gulf war of 1991) and nine years of UN-imposed trade sanctions, the Iraqi economy lies in tatters. The " oil-for-food " programme, introduced by UN Resolution 986 in 1995, has not halted the collapse of the health system and the deterioration of water supplies, which together pose one of the gravest threats to the health and well-being of the civilian population. The situation is now exacerbated by water shortages owing to the worst drought in decades.

The Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement and other humanitarian organizations can only hope to mitigate some of the worst effects of the sanctions. In mid-1999 the International Committee of the Red Cross extended its budget for the year by 60% in order to fund new programmes in the field of health and wat er and sanitation, which are to continue in the year 2000 -- in full awareness of the fact that humanitarian aid can not nearly cover the overwhelming needs of 22 million people.