HIGHLIGHTS

The  second  round  of  the  national  polio  campaign in Iraq  was  conducted   from  12  to  16  April  2015  targeting  5.6 Million  children  aged  0  month  to  5 years.  

 

Supported  by  WHO  and  other  partners  5.4 million  children  were  given  oral  polio  vaccine  (OPV) nationwide. WHO worked with the Directorates of Health (DOH), for  Anbar  and  Baghdad  and  the  Federal  Ministry  of Health to deploy six ambulances, essential medicines and  health  workers  to BzebazBridge  to  treat  IDPs on transit. 

WHO   donatedand   delivered four   caravans   to Habaniyah clinic, creating more space tohandle the growing  patient  caseloads  in  the  facility.  WHO  alsosupported  the  Directorate  of  HealthofAnbar withone caravan for Al-Khaldia toserve the health needs of the displaced people.Essential  medicines  and  kits  were  donated  to  the Directorate  of  Health  in  Anbar,  Amriat  Al  Falluja,Al-Baghdadi, Al-Khaldia, Haditha, Baghdad (Warehouse) to improve    access to treatmentof    internally displaced people

 

 

 

Highlights activities
• Ramadi City was liberated on 27 December 2015. However, active fighting is still ongoing in many parts of the city.

• Since June 2015, approximately 15 000 families have been displaced from Ramadi and are residing in various internally displaced persons (IDP) camps and host communities across eastern Anbar and western Baghdad.
• 380 families (2300 individuals) have been displaced since 27 December and are residing in the newly established Al-Qasr camp, north of Al-Habbaniyah Tourist City IDP camp. Al-Qasr camp is already over capacity and a new camp location is being considered.
Health facility assessments have been conducted in various secure cleared areas of the city but there remain many areas where assessments cannot beundertaken due to the fear of mines and booby traps. 

 

 

 

The Ministry of Health, Ninewa, Erbil and Dahuk Directorates of Health(DOH) in collaboration with WHO reached 332178 children under the age of 5 years during a masspolio vaccination campaign carried out in Ninewa, Erbil and Dahuk governorates. The campaign targeted 331 510 children displaced from Mosul and living in IDP camps and host communities achieving morethan 100% coverage.

WHO constructed and handed over two fully furnished and equipped primary health care clinics(PHCC) to Kirkuk and Ninewa DOHs to serve the health needs of internally displaced persons (IDPs) living in Laylan C and Al-sallemiyah 1 IDPcamps respectively

.More than 513 580consultations were recorded by health cluster partners Iraq widein May2017, of these, 216 284 consultations were recorded in WHO supportedhealth facilities including the onesrun by itsimplementing partners.

WHO donated to 7 NGO implementing partners working in Ninewa and Anbar Governorates emergency medical supplies sufficient for182 400 people including kits, medicines used to treat chronic conditions, skin infections andantibiotics. Also provided were essential medicines used during surgical procedures.

 

 

 

More than 18 497 people from Mosul city were referred to field hospitals through the established trauma pathways as of 23 July 2017, while 12 666 people treated at Trauma Stabilization Points near frontline areas of western Mosul as of 20 July 2017.
 A total number of consultations provided by the primary health care centers (PHCC) and mobile medical clinics (MMCs) in Mosul IDP camps has reached 931 369 since the beginning of the crisis till the 23rd of July this year. Almost 23 019 of overall consultations was reported in the past two weeks and showed the consistent need for primary health care services for Mosul IDPs.
 WHO organized a 5-day polio data quality self-assessment training workshop in Erbil to support the five directorates of health of Erbil, Suleimaniya, Duhok, Kirkuk and Ninewa in the area of quality data collection and analysis.
 
 
 

Summary 

Anew household survey of Iraq has found that approximately 600,000 people have been killed in the violence of the war that began with the U.S. invasion in March 2003.

The survey was conducted by an American and Iraqi team of public health researchers. Data were collected by Iraqi medical doctors with analysis conducted by faculty of the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health. The results will be published in the British medical journal, The Lancet.

The survey is the only population-based assessment of fatalities in Iraq during the war. The method, a survey of more than 1,800 households randomly selected in clusters that represent Iraq’s population, is a standard tool of epidemiology and is used by the U.S. Government and many other agencies.

The survey also reflects growing sectarian violence, a steep rise in deaths by gunshots, and very high mortality among young men. An additional 53,000 deaths due to non-violent causes were estimated to have occurred above the pre-invasion mortality rate, most of them in recent m

 

 

Health in Iraq

The series of events beginning with the Iran-Iraq war through the Persian Gulf War and the period of trade sanctions all had major effects on the health of Iraqis. During this period, several health assessments were carried out, all pointing to deteriorating health status among Iraqis. Many of these surveys concentrated on measurement of child health. As children are the most vulnerable members of a community, child health is a sensitive indicator of a community’s overall health status. Surveys conducted between January and August 1991, estimated that more than 46,900 children died as a consequence of war and sanctions, a threefold increase from the period prior to the war.22 Estimates in 1995 suggested that the effects of sanctions had increased the death toll among children.23 Evident in the graph below, the UN Oil-for-Food program introduced in 1996 helped improve conditions considerably, but this program had many difficulties.24 

 

 

Summary
At a minimum, 134,000 civilians have been killed by war's violence since 2003 in Iraq. But, as described below, many deaths in Iraq were unreported or unrecorded: thus, this number, based on tallies of government and press reports, is an undercount. If a full recording of Iraqi violent deaths due to war were to be made, the toll could be twice as high, according to Iraq Body Count (IBC), the one organization that has attempted to document all the violent deaths in Iraq that have resulted from the initiation of war ten years ago. Thus, the toll of violent death due to war may be 250,000 or more people.
The number of Iraqi men, women and children who been seriously injured in the war is about the same as the number killed.
In addition, many times the number killed by direct violence have likely died due to the effects of the destruction of Iraq's infrastructure.
Some of these numbers are disputed: some officials might argue that this is an over-estimate of the effects of war on Iraqi civilians; many more would argue that these estimates are too cautious. 

 

 

 

Editorial
The health situation in Iraq is deteriorating on almost every level. In this week’s issue, two doctors from Basrah describe how insulin is unavailable because it is not safe to distribute it. Last month the fi rst cases of cholera were reported. And in an interview with the non-governmental organisation Doctors for Iraq, Khaled Mahmud, head of resident doctors in Samarra General Hospital, described how power outages prevented the use of all the medical appliances in the hospital.
The worsening humanitarian situation was recently outlined in a UNAMI report. 54% of Iraqis are now living on less than US$1 a day and almost half of all children are malnourished. Since the coalition invasion
in 2003, 12 000 of Iraq’s 24 000 doctors have left Iraq.
More encouragingly, 3·6 million children have justbeen immunised against measles, mumps, and rubella

 

 

The health situation in Iraq is deteriorating on almost every level. In this week’s issue, two doctors from Basrah describe how insulin is unavailable because it is not safe to distribute it. Last month the fi rst cases of cholera were reported. And in an interview with the non-governmental organisation Doctors for Iraq, Khaled Mahmud, head of resident doctors in Samarra General Hospital, described how power outages prevented the use of all the medical appliances in the hospital. The worsening humanitarian situation was recently outlined in a UNAMI report. 54% of Iraqis are now living on less than US$1 a day and almost half of all children are malnourished. Since the coalition invasion in 2003, 12 000 of Iraq’s 24000 doctors have left Iraq. More encouragingly, 3·6 million children have just been immunised against measles, mumps, and rubella and last week UNICEF launched a 6-month action plan, which will address the specifi c needs of Iraqi children. In addition, the National Center for Drug Control and Research which will analyse the quality of pharmaceutical products imported into Iraq opened last month. When devising health plans for Iraq it is vital to con sider accessibility rather than availability. There is little point in having high quality drugs if it is not safe to distri bute them, or new tertiary centres that people cannot access due to restrictive curfews and checkpoints. If Iraqi citizens are to have any hope of a better life, there must be a comprehensive yet realistic strategy—with input from all stakeholders, most importantly the Iraqi people—that adequately addresses the health needs in Iraq. Ignoring what is happening on the ground while planning for the f